The positive influence of sport Invention type bac

Amérique du Nord 2016, LV1

Jim McMillin has to deliver a motivational speech to young people about the way sport can positively influence their lives. Write the speech. (250 words)

Nine UW rowers who showed up Hitler in 1936 and won gold

http://old.seattletimes.com

Ninety-year-old Jim McMillin runs bony fingers over the cedar bow of the Husky Clipper, which reclines in the Pocock Rowing Center on Lake Union.
“That boat never lost a race,” he said.
Neither did those in it. […]
Certainly, war was brewing in Europe as the Huskies boarded a steamship in New York with the rest of the American Olympic team for the eight-day trip to Hamburg, Germany.
“We didn't care what was going on around us. We had a job to do, and that was win a race,” said Bob Moch, the coxswain of the UW crew. “We were a pretty directed bunch.” […]
Moch, McMillin, Morris and Joe Rantz, who rowed No. 7, are the survivors of the crew, all at or near 90 years old. […]
Aging and anonymous as they might be today, the UW rowers were the talk of the state in the 1930s.
“I was 13 years old, and it was the biggest thing that had ever happened in Seattle,” said Stan Pocock, the son of George Pocock, who built the Husky Clipper. “They might not have been aware of the significance of winning a gold medal in Germany at that time, but people back home were.” […]
Today, national teams, not colleges, represent their countries.
The guys from 1936 don't much like the notion of rowers training full time into their 30 s to be members of national teams.
“We had lives to live, jobs to do,” McMillin said. “We were amateurs.”
Besides the six engineers, Day became a doctor, Moch an attorney and Hume an international business consultant.

Quel type de texte faut-il produire ?

Nine UW rowers who showed up Hitler in 1936 and won gold

http://old.seattletimes.com

Ninety-year-old Jim McMillin runs bony fingers over the cedar bow of the Husky Clipper, which reclines in the Pocock Rowing Center on Lake Union.
“That boat never lost a race,” he said.
Neither did those in it. […]
Certainly, war was brewing in Europe as the Huskies boarded a steamship in New York with the rest of the American Olympic team for the eight-day trip to Hamburg, Germany.
“We didn't care what was going on around us. We had a job to do, and that was win a race,” said Bob Moch, the coxswain of the UW crew. “We were a pretty directed bunch.” […]
Moch, McMillin, Morris and Joe Rantz, who rowed No. 7, are the survivors of the crew, all at or near 90 years old. […]
Aging and anonymous as they might be today, the UW rowers were the talk of the state in the 1930s.
“I was 13 years old, and it was the biggest thing that had ever happened in Seattle,” said Stan Pocock, the son of George Pocock, who built the Husky Clipper. “They might not have been aware of the significance of winning a gold medal in Germany at that time, but people back home were.” […]
Today, national teams, not colleges, represent their countries.
The guys from 1936 don't much like the notion of rowers training full time into their 30 s to be members of national teams.
“We had lives to live, jobs to do,” McMillin said. “We were amateurs.”
Besides the six engineers, Day became a doctor, Moch an attorney and Hume an international business consultant.

Quels temps sont à privilégier dans la rédaction du discours ?

Nine UW rowers who showed up Hitler in 1936 and won gold

http://old.seattletimes.com

Ninety-year-old Jim McMillin runs bony fingers over the cedar bow of the Husky Clipper, which reclines in the Pocock Rowing Center on Lake Union.
“That boat never lost a race,” he said.
Neither did those in it. […]
Certainly, war was brewing in Europe as the Huskies boarded a steamship in New York with the rest of the American Olympic team for the eight-day trip to Hamburg, Germany.
“We didn't care what was going on around us. We had a job to do, and that was win a race,” said Bob Moch, the coxswain of the UW crew. “We were a pretty directed bunch.” […]
Moch, McMillin, Morris and Joe Rantz, who rowed No. 7, are the survivors of the crew, all at or near 90 years old. […]
Aging and anonymous as they might be today, the UW rowers were the talk of the state in the 1930s.
“I was 13 years old, and it was the biggest thing that had ever happened in Seattle,” said Stan Pocock, the son of George Pocock, who built the Husky Clipper. “They might not have been aware of the significance of winning a gold medal in Germany at that time, but people back home were.” […]
Today, national teams, not colleges, represent their countries.
The guys from 1936 don't much like the notion of rowers training full time into their 30 s to be members of national teams.
“We had lives to live, jobs to do,” McMillin said. “We were amateurs.”
Besides the six engineers, Day became a doctor, Moch an attorney and Hume an international business consultant.

Quel terme employé fait référence à la gratitude ?

Nine UW rowers who showed up Hitler in 1936 and won gold

http://old.seattletimes.com

Ninety-year-old Jim McMillin runs bony fingers over the cedar bow of the Husky Clipper, which reclines in the Pocock Rowing Center on Lake Union.
“That boat never lost a race,” he said.
Neither did those in it. […]
Certainly, war was brewing in Europe as the Huskies boarded a steamship in New York with the rest of the American Olympic team for the eight-day trip to Hamburg, Germany.
“We didn't care what was going on around us. We had a job to do, and that was win a race,” said Bob Moch, the coxswain of the UW crew. “We were a pretty directed bunch.” […]
Moch, McMillin, Morris and Joe Rantz, who rowed No. 7, are the survivors of the crew, all at or near 90 years old. […]
Aging and anonymous as they might be today, the UW rowers were the talk of the state in the 1930s.
“I was 13 years old, and it was the biggest thing that had ever happened in Seattle,” said Stan Pocock, the son of George Pocock, who built the Husky Clipper. “They might not have been aware of the significance of winning a gold medal in Germany at that time, but people back home were.” […]
Today, national teams, not colleges, represent their countries.
The guys from 1936 don't much like the notion of rowers training full time into their 30 s to be members of national teams.
“We had lives to live, jobs to do,” McMillin said. “We were amateurs.”
Besides the six engineers, Day became a doctor, Moch an attorney and Hume an international business consultant.

Quelle expression fait référence au "dépassement de soi" ?

Nine UW rowers who showed up Hitler in 1936 and won gold

http://old.seattletimes.com

Ninety-year-old Jim McMillin runs bony fingers over the cedar bow of the Husky Clipper, which reclines in the Pocock Rowing Center on Lake Union.
“That boat never lost a race,” he said.
Neither did those in it. […]
Certainly, war was brewing in Europe as the Huskies boarded a steamship in New York with the rest of the American Olympic team for the eight-day trip to Hamburg, Germany.
“We didn't care what was going on around us. We had a job to do, and that was win a race,” said Bob Moch, the coxswain of the UW crew. “We were a pretty directed bunch.” […]
Moch, McMillin, Morris and Joe Rantz, who rowed No. 7, are the survivors of the crew, all at or near 90 years old. […]
Aging and anonymous as they might be today, the UW rowers were the talk of the state in the 1930s.
“I was 13 years old, and it was the biggest thing that had ever happened in Seattle,” said Stan Pocock, the son of George Pocock, who built the Husky Clipper. “They might not have been aware of the significance of winning a gold medal in Germany at that time, but people back home were.” […]
Today, national teams, not colleges, represent their countries.
The guys from 1936 don't much like the notion of rowers training full time into their 30 s to be members of national teams.
“We had lives to live, jobs to do,” McMillin said. “We were amateurs.”
Besides the six engineers, Day became a doctor, Moch an attorney and Hume an international business consultant.

Quel adjectif souligne l'avantage d'une bonne santé ?

Nine UW rowers who showed up Hitler in 1936 and won gold

http://old.seattletimes.com

Ninety-year-old Jim McMillin runs bony fingers over the cedar bow of the Husky Clipper, which reclines in the Pocock Rowing Center on Lake Union.
“That boat never lost a race,” he said.
Neither did those in it. […]
Certainly, war was brewing in Europe as the Huskies boarded a steamship in New York with the rest of the American Olympic team for the eight-day trip to Hamburg, Germany.
“We didn't care what was going on around us. We had a job to do, and that was win a race,” said Bob Moch, the coxswain of the UW crew. “We were a pretty directed bunch.” […]
Moch, McMillin, Morris and Joe Rantz, who rowed No. 7, are the survivors of the crew, all at or near 90 years old. […]
Aging and anonymous as they might be today, the UW rowers were the talk of the state in the 1930s.
“I was 13 years old, and it was the biggest thing that had ever happened in Seattle,” said Stan Pocock, the son of George Pocock, who built the Husky Clipper. “They might not have been aware of the significance of winning a gold medal in Germany at that time, but people back home were.” […]
Today, national teams, not colleges, represent their countries.
The guys from 1936 don't much like the notion of rowers training full time into their 30 s to be members of national teams.
“We had lives to live, jobs to do,” McMillin said. “We were amateurs.”
Besides the six engineers, Day became a doctor, Moch an attorney and Hume an international business consultant.