Writing an e-mailInvention type bac

The narrator in document B writes an e-mail to a friend to relate a family outing in a restaurant in America. (300 words)

Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi, 2003

Moving to America was both exciting and frightening, but we found great comfort in knowing my father spoke English. Having spent years regaling us with stories about his graduate years in America, he had left us with the distinct impression that America was his second home. My mother and I planned to stick close to him, letting him guide us through the exotic American landscape that he knew so well. We counted on him not only to translate the language but also to translate the culture, to be a link to the most foreign of lands. He was to be our own private Rosetta stone1.
Once we reached America, we wondered whether perhaps my father had confused his life in America with someone else's. Judging from the bewildered looks of store cashiers, gas station attendants, and waiters, my father spoke a version of English not yet shared with the rest of America. His attempts to find a "vater closet" in a department store would usually lead us to the drinking fountain or the home furnishings section. Asking my father to ask a waitress the definition of "sloppy Joe" or "Tater Tots" was no problem. His translations, however, were highly suspect. Waitresses would spend several minutes responding to my father's questions, and these responses, in turn, would be translated as "She doesn't know." Thanks to my father's translations, we stayed away from hot dogs, catfish, and hush puppies2, and no amount of caviar in the sea would have convinced us to try mud pie.
We wondered how my father had managed to spend several years attending school in America yet remain utterly befuddled by Americans. We soon discovered that his college years had been mainly spent at the library, where he had managed to avoid contact with all Americans except his engineering professors. As long as the conversation was limited to vectors, surface tension, and fluid mechanics, my father was Fred Astaire3 with words. But one step outside the scintillating world of petroleum engineering and he had two left tongues.

1 Rosetta stone: a stone that helped understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs
2 Hush puppies: fried food
3 Fred Astaire: an American musical dancer (1899 − 1987)

Quel type de production est attendu ?

Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi, 2003

Moving to America was both exciting and frightening, but we found great comfort in knowing my father spoke English. Having spent years regaling us with stories about his graduate years in America, he had left us with the distinct impression that America was his second home. My mother and I planned to stick close to him, letting him guide us through the exotic American landscape that he knew so well. We counted on him not only to translate the language but also to translate the culture, to be a link to the most foreign of lands. He was to be our own private Rosetta stone1.
Once we reached America, we wondered whether perhaps my father had confused his life in America with someone else's. Judging from the bewildered looks of store cashiers, gas station attendants, and waiters, my father spoke a version of English not yet shared with the rest of America. His attempts to find a "vater closet" in a department store would usually lead us to the drinking fountain or the home furnishings section. Asking my father to ask a waitress the definition of "sloppy Joe" or "Tater Tots" was no problem. His translations, however, were highly suspect. Waitresses would spend several minutes responding to my father's questions, and these responses, in turn, would be translated as "She doesn't know." Thanks to my father's translations, we stayed away from hot dogs, catfish, and hush puppies2, and no amount of caviar in the sea would have convinced us to try mud pie.
We wondered how my father had managed to spend several years attending school in America yet remain utterly befuddled by Americans. We soon discovered that his college years had been mainly spent at the library, where he had managed to avoid contact with all Americans except his engineering professors. As long as the conversation was limited to vectors, surface tension, and fluid mechanics, my father was Fred Astaire3 with words. But one step outside the scintillating world of petroleum engineering and he had two left tongues.

1 Rosetta stone: a stone that helped understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs
2 Hush puppies: fried food
3 Fred Astaire: an American musical dancer (1899 − 1987)

Quels temps doivent être principalement utilisés pour rédiger ce texte ?

Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi, 2003

Moving to America was both exciting and frightening, but we found great comfort in knowing my father spoke English. Having spent years regaling us with stories about his graduate years in America, he had left us with the distinct impression that America was his second home. My mother and I planned to stick close to him, letting him guide us through the exotic American landscape that he knew so well. We counted on him not only to translate the language but also to translate the culture, to be a link to the most foreign of lands. He was to be our own private Rosetta stone1.
Once we reached America, we wondered whether perhaps my father had confused his life in America with someone else's. Judging from the bewildered looks of store cashiers, gas station attendants, and waiters, my father spoke a version of English not yet shared with the rest of America. His attempts to find a "vater closet" in a department store would usually lead us to the drinking fountain or the home furnishings section. Asking my father to ask a waitress the definition of "sloppy Joe" or "Tater Tots" was no problem. His translations, however, were highly suspect. Waitresses would spend several minutes responding to my father's questions, and these responses, in turn, would be translated as "She doesn't know." Thanks to my father's translations, we stayed away from hot dogs, catfish, and hush puppies2, and no amount of caviar in the sea would have convinced us to try mud pie.
We wondered how my father had managed to spend several years attending school in America yet remain utterly befuddled by Americans. We soon discovered that his college years had been mainly spent at the library, where he had managed to avoid contact with all Americans except his engineering professors. As long as the conversation was limited to vectors, surface tension, and fluid mechanics, my father was Fred Astaire3 with words. But one step outside the scintillating world of petroleum engineering and he had two left tongues.

1 Rosetta stone: a stone that helped understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs
2 Hush puppies: fried food
3 Fred Astaire: an American musical dancer (1899 − 1987)

Quelle expression souligne que le processus d'adaptation à la vie américaine n'est pas encore achevé ?

Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi, 2003

Moving to America was both exciting and frightening, but we found great comfort in knowing my father spoke English. Having spent years regaling us with stories about his graduate years in America, he had left us with the distinct impression that America was his second home. My mother and I planned to stick close to him, letting him guide us through the exotic American landscape that he knew so well. We counted on him not only to translate the language but also to translate the culture, to be a link to the most foreign of lands. He was to be our own private Rosetta stone1.
Once we reached America, we wondered whether perhaps my father had confused his life in America with someone else's. Judging from the bewildered looks of store cashiers, gas station attendants, and waiters, my father spoke a version of English not yet shared with the rest of America. His attempts to find a "vater closet" in a department store would usually lead us to the drinking fountain or the home furnishings section. Asking my father to ask a waitress the definition of "sloppy Joe" or "Tater Tots" was no problem. His translations, however, were highly suspect. Waitresses would spend several minutes responding to my father's questions, and these responses, in turn, would be translated as "She doesn't know." Thanks to my father's translations, we stayed away from hot dogs, catfish, and hush puppies2, and no amount of caviar in the sea would have convinced us to try mud pie.
We wondered how my father had managed to spend several years attending school in America yet remain utterly befuddled by Americans. We soon discovered that his college years had been mainly spent at the library, where he had managed to avoid contact with all Americans except his engineering professors. As long as the conversation was limited to vectors, surface tension, and fluid mechanics, my father was Fred Astaire3 with words. But one step outside the scintillating world of petroleum engineering and he had two left tongues.

1 Rosetta stone: a stone that helped understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs
2 Hush puppies: fried food
3 Fred Astaire: an American musical dancer (1899 − 1987)

Quelle expression souligne la dépendance au père en matière de communication ?

Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi, 2003

Moving to America was both exciting and frightening, but we found great comfort in knowing my father spoke English. Having spent years regaling us with stories about his graduate years in America, he had left us with the distinct impression that America was his second home. My mother and I planned to stick close to him, letting him guide us through the exotic American landscape that he knew so well. We counted on him not only to translate the language but also to translate the culture, to be a link to the most foreign of lands. He was to be our own private Rosetta stone1.
Once we reached America, we wondered whether perhaps my father had confused his life in America with someone else's. Judging from the bewildered looks of store cashiers, gas station attendants, and waiters, my father spoke a version of English not yet shared with the rest of America. His attempts to find a "vater closet" in a department store would usually lead us to the drinking fountain or the home furnishings section. Asking my father to ask a waitress the definition of "sloppy Joe" or "Tater Tots" was no problem. His translations, however, were highly suspect. Waitresses would spend several minutes responding to my father's questions, and these responses, in turn, would be translated as "She doesn't know." Thanks to my father's translations, we stayed away from hot dogs, catfish, and hush puppies2, and no amount of caviar in the sea would have convinced us to try mud pie.
We wondered how my father had managed to spend several years attending school in America yet remain utterly befuddled by Americans. We soon discovered that his college years had been mainly spent at the library, where he had managed to avoid contact with all Americans except his engineering professors. As long as the conversation was limited to vectors, surface tension, and fluid mechanics, my father was Fred Astaire3 with words. But one step outside the scintillating world of petroleum engineering and he had two left tongues.

1 Rosetta stone: a stone that helped understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs
2 Hush puppies: fried food
3 Fred Astaire: an American musical dancer (1899 − 1987)

Quelle expression souligne les craintes du narrateur concernant les différences culturelles ?

Firoozeh Dumas, Funny in Farsi, 2003

Moving to America was both exciting and frightening, but we found great comfort in knowing my father spoke English. Having spent years regaling us with stories about his graduate years in America, he had left us with the distinct impression that America was his second home. My mother and I planned to stick close to him, letting him guide us through the exotic American landscape that he knew so well. We counted on him not only to translate the language but also to translate the culture, to be a link to the most foreign of lands. He was to be our own private Rosetta stone1.
Once we reached America, we wondered whether perhaps my father had confused his life in America with someone else's. Judging from the bewildered looks of store cashiers, gas station attendants, and waiters, my father spoke a version of English not yet shared with the rest of America. His attempts to find a "vater closet" in a department store would usually lead us to the drinking fountain or the home furnishings section. Asking my father to ask a waitress the definition of "sloppy Joe" or "Tater Tots" was no problem. His translations, however, were highly suspect. Waitresses would spend several minutes responding to my father's questions, and these responses, in turn, would be translated as "She doesn't know." Thanks to my father's translations, we stayed away from hot dogs, catfish, and hush puppies2, and no amount of caviar in the sea would have convinced us to try mud pie.
We wondered how my father had managed to spend several years attending school in America yet remain utterly befuddled by Americans. We soon discovered that his college years had been mainly spent at the library, where he had managed to avoid contact with all Americans except his engineering professors. As long as the conversation was limited to vectors, surface tension, and fluid mechanics, my father was Fred Astaire3 with words. But one step outside the scintillating world of petroleum engineering and he had two left tongues.

1 Rosetta stone: a stone that helped understanding Egyptian hieroglyphs
2 Hush puppies: fried food
3 Fred Astaire: an American musical dancer (1899 − 1987)

Questions fréquentes

Quelles sont les matières disponibles sur Kartable ?

Sur Kartable, l'élève accède à toutes les matières principales de la primaire au lycée, y compris pour les spécialités et les options. Mathématiques, physique-chimie, SVT, sciences, français, littérature, histoire, géographie, enseignement moral et civique, SES, philosophie, anglais, allemand et espagnol.
Inscrivez-vous

Les cours sont-ils conformes aux programmes officiels de l'Education nationale ?

L'intégralité des cours sur Kartable est rédigée par des professeurs de l'Éducation nationale et est conforme au programme en vigueur, incluant la réforme du lycée de l'année 2019-2020.
Choisissez votre formule

L'élève peut-il accéder à tous les niveaux ?

Sur Kartable, l'élève peut accéder à toutes les matières dans tous les niveaux de son choix. Ainsi, il peut revenir sur les notions fondamentales qu'il n'aurait pas comprises les années précédentes et se perfectionner.
Plus d'info

Kartable est-il gratuit ?

L'inscription gratuite donne accès à 10 contenus (cours, exercices, fiches ou quiz). Pour débloquer l'accès illimité aux contenus, aux corrections d'exercices, mode hors-ligne et téléchargement en PDF, il faut souscrire à l'offre Kartable Premium.
Plus d'info

Qui rédige les cours de Kartable ?

L'intégralité des contenus disponibles sur Kartable est conçue par notre équipe pédagogique, composée de près de 200 enseignants de l'Éducation nationale que nous avons sélectionnés.
Afficher plus

Qu'est ce que le service Prof en ligne ?

L'option Prof en ligne est un service de chat en ligne entre élèves et professeurs. Notre Prof en ligne répond à toutes les questions sur les cours, exercices, méthodologie et aide au devoirs, pour toutes les classes et dans toutes les matières. Le service est ouvert du lundi au vendredi de 16h à 19h pour les membres ayant souscrit à l'option.
Choisissez votre formule