Make the world a better placeArgumentation type bac

Pondichéry, 2016, LV1

‘We've got some campaigning work to do.' How can each and every one of us make the world a better place? (+/- 150 words)

Ken Follett, Fall of Giants, 2010

Her angry feminism had set as hard as concrete during years of living alongside the tough, hard-working, dirt-poor women of London's East End. Men often told a fairy tale in which there was a division of labor in families, the man going out to earn money, the woman looking after home and children. Reality was different. Most of the women Ethel knew worked twelve hours a day and looked after home and children as well. Underfed, overworked, living in hovels, and dressed in rags, they could still sing songs, and laugh, love their children. In Ethel's view one of those women had more right to vote than any ten men.
She'd been arguing this for so long that she felt quite strange when votes for women became a real possibility in the middle of 1917. As a little girl she had asked: ‘What will it be like in heaven?' and had never got a satisfactory answer.
Parliament agreed to a debate in mid-June. ‘It's the result of two compromises,' Ethel said excitedly to Bernie when she read the report in The Times. ‘The Speaker's Conference, which Asquith called to sidestep the issue, was desperate to avoid a row.'
Bernie was giving Lloyd his breakfast, feeding him toast dipped in sweet tea. ‘I assume the government is afraid that women will start chaining themselves to railings again.'
Ethel nodded. ‘And if the politicians get caught up in that kind of fuss, people will say they're not concentrating on winning the war. So the parliamentary committee recommended giving the vote only to women over thirty who are householders or the wives of householders. Which means I'm too young.'
‘That was the first compromise,' said Bernie. ‘And the second?'
‘According to Maud, the cabinet was split.' The War Cabinet consisted of four men plus the prime minister, Lloyd George. ‘Curzon is against us, obviously.' Earl Curzon, the leader of the House of Lords, was proudly misogynist. He was president of the League for Opposing Women's Suffrage. ‘So is Milner. But Henderson supports us.' Arthur Henderson was the leader of the Labour Party, whose M.P.s supported the women, even though many Labour Party men did not. ‘Bonar Law is with us, though lukewarm.'
‘Two in favor, two against, and Lloyd George as usual wanting to keep everyone happy.'
‘The compromise is that there will be a free vote.' That meant the government would not order its supporters to vote one way or the other.
‘So that whatever happens it won't be the government's fault.'
‘No one ever said Lloyd George was ingenuous.'
‘But he's given you a chance.'
‘A chance is all it is. We've got some campaigning work to do.'

Par quel verbe est traduite l'idée "d'avoir les moyens" financiers pour faire quelque chose ?

Ken Follett, Fall of Giants, 2010

Her angry feminism had set as hard as concrete during years of living alongside the tough, hard-working, dirt-poor women of London's East End. Men often told a fairy tale in which there was a division of labor in families, the man going out to earn money, the woman looking after home and children. Reality was different. Most of the women Ethel knew worked twelve hours a day and looked after home and children as well. Underfed, overworked, living in hovels, and dressed in rags, they could still sing songs, and laugh, love their children. In Ethel's view one of those women had more right to vote than any ten men.
She'd been arguing this for so long that she felt quite strange when votes for women became a real possibility in the middle of 1917. As a little girl she had asked: ‘What will it be like in heaven?' and had never got a satisfactory answer.
Parliament agreed to a debate in mid-June. ‘It's the result of two compromises,' Ethel said excitedly to Bernie when she read the report in The Times. ‘The Speaker's Conference, which Asquith called to sidestep the issue, was desperate to avoid a row.'
Bernie was giving Lloyd his breakfast, feeding him toast dipped in sweet tea. ‘I assume the government is afraid that women will start chaining themselves to railings again.'
Ethel nodded. ‘And if the politicians get caught up in that kind of fuss, people will say they're not concentrating on winning the war. So the parliamentary committee recommended giving the vote only to women over thirty who are householders or the wives of householders. Which means I'm too young.'
‘That was the first compromise,' said Bernie. ‘And the second?'
‘According to Maud, the cabinet was split.' The War Cabinet consisted of four men plus the prime minister, Lloyd George. ‘Curzon is against us, obviously.' Earl Curzon, the leader of the House of Lords, was proudly misogynist. He was president of the League for Opposing Women's Suffrage. ‘So is Milner. But Henderson supports us.' Arthur Henderson was the leader of the Labour Party, whose M.P.s supported the women, even though many Labour Party men did not. ‘Bonar Law is with us, though lukewarm.'
‘Two in favor, two against, and Lloyd George as usual wanting to keep everyone happy.'
‘The compromise is that there will be a free vote.' That meant the government would not order its supporters to vote one way or the other.
‘So that whatever happens it won't be the government's fault.'
‘No one ever said Lloyd George was ingenuous.'
‘But he's given you a chance.'
‘A chance is all it is. We've got some campaigning work to do.'

Quel nom anglais traduit la notion d'association caritative ?

Ken Follett, Fall of Giants, 2010

Her angry feminism had set as hard as concrete during years of living alongside the tough, hard-working, dirt-poor women of London's East End. Men often told a fairy tale in which there was a division of labor in families, the man going out to earn money, the woman looking after home and children. Reality was different. Most of the women Ethel knew worked twelve hours a day and looked after home and children as well. Underfed, overworked, living in hovels, and dressed in rags, they could still sing songs, and laugh, love their children. In Ethel's view one of those women had more right to vote than any ten men.
She'd been arguing this for so long that she felt quite strange when votes for women became a real possibility in the middle of 1917. As a little girl she had asked: ‘What will it be like in heaven?' and had never got a satisfactory answer.
Parliament agreed to a debate in mid-June. ‘It's the result of two compromises,' Ethel said excitedly to Bernie when she read the report in The Times. ‘The Speaker's Conference, which Asquith called to sidestep the issue, was desperate to avoid a row.'
Bernie was giving Lloyd his breakfast, feeding him toast dipped in sweet tea. ‘I assume the government is afraid that women will start chaining themselves to railings again.'
Ethel nodded. ‘And if the politicians get caught up in that kind of fuss, people will say they're not concentrating on winning the war. So the parliamentary committee recommended giving the vote only to women over thirty who are householders or the wives of householders. Which means I'm too young.'
‘That was the first compromise,' said Bernie. ‘And the second?'
‘According to Maud, the cabinet was split.' The War Cabinet consisted of four men plus the prime minister, Lloyd George. ‘Curzon is against us, obviously.' Earl Curzon, the leader of the House of Lords, was proudly misogynist. He was president of the League for Opposing Women's Suffrage. ‘So is Milner. But Henderson supports us.' Arthur Henderson was the leader of the Labour Party, whose M.P.s supported the women, even though many Labour Party men did not. ‘Bonar Law is with us, though lukewarm.'
‘Two in favor, two against, and Lloyd George as usual wanting to keep everyone happy.'
‘The compromise is that there will be a free vote.' That meant the government would not order its supporters to vote one way or the other.
‘So that whatever happens it won't be the government's fault.'
‘No one ever said Lloyd George was ingenuous.'
‘But he's given you a chance.'
‘A chance is all it is. We've got some campaigning work to do.'

Quel verbe traduit l'idée d'un financement par l'argent ?

Ken Follett, Fall of Giants, 2010

Her angry feminism had set as hard as concrete during years of living alongside the tough, hard-working, dirt-poor women of London's East End. Men often told a fairy tale in which there was a division of labor in families, the man going out to earn money, the woman looking after home and children. Reality was different. Most of the women Ethel knew worked twelve hours a day and looked after home and children as well. Underfed, overworked, living in hovels, and dressed in rags, they could still sing songs, and laugh, love their children. In Ethel's view one of those women had more right to vote than any ten men.
She'd been arguing this for so long that she felt quite strange when votes for women became a real possibility in the middle of 1917. As a little girl she had asked: ‘What will it be like in heaven?' and had never got a satisfactory answer.
Parliament agreed to a debate in mid-June. ‘It's the result of two compromises,' Ethel said excitedly to Bernie when she read the report in The Times. ‘The Speaker's Conference, which Asquith called to sidestep the issue, was desperate to avoid a row.'
Bernie was giving Lloyd his breakfast, feeding him toast dipped in sweet tea. ‘I assume the government is afraid that women will start chaining themselves to railings again.'
Ethel nodded. ‘And if the politicians get caught up in that kind of fuss, people will say they're not concentrating on winning the war. So the parliamentary committee recommended giving the vote only to women over thirty who are householders or the wives of householders. Which means I'm too young.'
‘That was the first compromise,' said Bernie. ‘And the second?'
‘According to Maud, the cabinet was split.' The War Cabinet consisted of four men plus the prime minister, Lloyd George. ‘Curzon is against us, obviously.' Earl Curzon, the leader of the House of Lords, was proudly misogynist. He was president of the League for Opposing Women's Suffrage. ‘So is Milner. But Henderson supports us.' Arthur Henderson was the leader of the Labour Party, whose M.P.s supported the women, even though many Labour Party men did not. ‘Bonar Law is with us, though lukewarm.'
‘Two in favor, two against, and Lloyd George as usual wanting to keep everyone happy.'
‘The compromise is that there will be a free vote.' That meant the government would not order its supporters to vote one way or the other.
‘So that whatever happens it won't be the government's fault.'
‘No one ever said Lloyd George was ingenuous.'
‘But he's given you a chance.'
‘A chance is all it is. We've got some campaigning work to do.'

Quel verbe traduit l'idée de s'impliquer activement ?

Ken Follett, Fall of Giants, 2010

Her angry feminism had set as hard as concrete during years of living alongside the tough, hard-working, dirt-poor women of London's East End. Men often told a fairy tale in which there was a division of labor in families, the man going out to earn money, the woman looking after home and children. Reality was different. Most of the women Ethel knew worked twelve hours a day and looked after home and children as well. Underfed, overworked, living in hovels, and dressed in rags, they could still sing songs, and laugh, love their children. In Ethel's view one of those women had more right to vote than any ten men.
She'd been arguing this for so long that she felt quite strange when votes for women became a real possibility in the middle of 1917. As a little girl she had asked: ‘What will it be like in heaven?' and had never got a satisfactory answer.
Parliament agreed to a debate in mid-June. ‘It's the result of two compromises,' Ethel said excitedly to Bernie when she read the report in The Times. ‘The Speaker's Conference, which Asquith called to sidestep the issue, was desperate to avoid a row.'
Bernie was giving Lloyd his breakfast, feeding him toast dipped in sweet tea. ‘I assume the government is afraid that women will start chaining themselves to railings again.'
Ethel nodded. ‘And if the politicians get caught up in that kind of fuss, people will say they're not concentrating on winning the war. So the parliamentary committee recommended giving the vote only to women over thirty who are householders or the wives of householders. Which means I'm too young.'
‘That was the first compromise,' said Bernie. ‘And the second?'
‘According to Maud, the cabinet was split.' The War Cabinet consisted of four men plus the prime minister, Lloyd George. ‘Curzon is against us, obviously.' Earl Curzon, the leader of the House of Lords, was proudly misogynist. He was president of the League for Opposing Women's Suffrage. ‘So is Milner. But Henderson supports us.' Arthur Henderson was the leader of the Labour Party, whose M.P.s supported the women, even though many Labour Party men did not. ‘Bonar Law is with us, though lukewarm.'
‘Two in favor, two against, and Lloyd George as usual wanting to keep everyone happy.'
‘The compromise is that there will be a free vote.' That meant the government would not order its supporters to vote one way or the other.
‘So that whatever happens it won't be the government's fault.'
‘No one ever said Lloyd George was ingenuous.'
‘But he's given you a chance.'
‘A chance is all it is. We've got some campaigning work to do.'

Quelle expression fait référence aux repas distribués aux plus démunis ?

Ken Follett, Fall of Giants, 2010

Her angry feminism had set as hard as concrete during years of living alongside the tough, hard-working, dirt-poor women of London's East End. Men often told a fairy tale in which there was a division of labor in families, the man going out to earn money, the woman looking after home and children. Reality was different. Most of the women Ethel knew worked twelve hours a day and looked after home and children as well. Underfed, overworked, living in hovels, and dressed in rags, they could still sing songs, and laugh, love their children. In Ethel's view one of those women had more right to vote than any ten men.
She'd been arguing this for so long that she felt quite strange when votes for women became a real possibility in the middle of 1917. As a little girl she had asked: ‘What will it be like in heaven?' and had never got a satisfactory answer.
Parliament agreed to a debate in mid-June. ‘It's the result of two compromises,' Ethel said excitedly to Bernie when she read the report in The Times. ‘The Speaker's Conference, which Asquith called to sidestep the issue, was desperate to avoid a row.'
Bernie was giving Lloyd his breakfast, feeding him toast dipped in sweet tea. ‘I assume the government is afraid that women will start chaining themselves to railings again.'
Ethel nodded. ‘And if the politicians get caught up in that kind of fuss, people will say they're not concentrating on winning the war. So the parliamentary committee recommended giving the vote only to women over thirty who are householders or the wives of householders. Which means I'm too young.'
‘That was the first compromise,' said Bernie. ‘And the second?'
‘According to Maud, the cabinet was split.' The War Cabinet consisted of four men plus the prime minister, Lloyd George. ‘Curzon is against us, obviously.' Earl Curzon, the leader of the House of Lords, was proudly misogynist. He was president of the League for Opposing Women's Suffrage. ‘So is Milner. But Henderson supports us.' Arthur Henderson was the leader of the Labour Party, whose M.P.s supported the women, even though many Labour Party men did not. ‘Bonar Law is with us, though lukewarm.'
‘Two in favor, two against, and Lloyd George as usual wanting to keep everyone happy.'
‘The compromise is that there will be a free vote.' That meant the government would not order its supporters to vote one way or the other.
‘So that whatever happens it won't be the government's fault.'
‘No one ever said Lloyd George was ingenuous.'
‘But he's given you a chance.'
‘A chance is all it is. We've got some campaigning work to do.'