Write a parents' dialogueInvention type bac

Pondichéry, 2016, LV1

The narrator's parents continue the conversation after their daughter has left the room. Write the dialogue. (+/- 150 words)

Douglas Kennedy, The Pursuit of Happiness, 2002

Predictably, my parents tried to block my move there. When I announced – around three weeks before my graduation – that I had been offered a trainee job at Life, they were horrified. I was home for the weekend in Hartford (a trip I made deliberately to break the job news to them, and also to inform them that I wouldn't be accepting Horace's marriage proposal). Ten minutes into the conversation, the emotional temperature within our household quickly hit boiling point.
‘I am not having any daughter of mine living by herself in that venal, indecent city,' my father pronounced.
‘New York is hardly indecent – and Life isn't exactly Confidential,' I said, mentioning a well-known scandal sheet of the time. ‘Anyway I thought you'd be thrilled with my news. Life only accepts ten trainees a year. It's an incredibly prestigious offer.'
‘Father's still right,' my mother said, ‘New York is no place for a young woman without family.' ‘Eric's not family?'
‘Your brother is not the most moral of men,' my father said.
‘And what does that mean?' I said angrily.
My father was suddenly flustered, but he covered up his embarrassment by saying, ‘It doesn't matter what it means. What matters is the simple fact that I will not permit you to live in Manhattan.'
‘I am twenty-two years old, Father.'
‘That's not the issue.'
‘You have no legal right to tell me what I can or cannot do.'
‘Don't hector your father,' my mother said. ‘And I must tell you that you are making a dreadful mistake by not marrying Horace.'
‘I knew you'd say that.'
‘Horace is a splendid young man,' my father said. ‘Horace is a very nice young man with a very nice, dull future ahead of him.' ‘You are being arrogant,' he said.
‘No – just accurate. Because I will not be pushed into a life I don't want.'
‘I am not pushing you into any life…' my father said.
‘By forbidding me from going to New York, you are stopping me from taking control of my own destiny.'
‘Your destiny!' my father said, with cruel irony. ‘You actually think you have a destiny! What bad novels have you been reading at Bryn Mawr?'
I stormed out of the room. I ran upstairs and fell on the bed, sobbing. Neither of my parents came up to comfort me. Nor did I expect them to. That wasn't their style.

Quel type de texte est attendu ?

Douglas Kennedy, The Pursuit of Happiness, 2002

Predictably, my parents tried to block my move there. When I announced – around three weeks before my graduation – that I had been offered a trainee job at Life, they were horrified. I was home for the weekend in Hartford (a trip I made deliberately to break the job news to them, and also to inform them that I wouldn't be accepting Horace's marriage proposal). Ten minutes into the conversation, the emotional temperature within our household quickly hit boiling point.
‘I am not having any daughter of mine living by herself in that venal, indecent city,' my father pronounced.
‘New York is hardly indecent – and Life isn't exactly Confidential,' I said, mentioning a well-known scandal sheet of the time. ‘Anyway I thought you'd be thrilled with my news. Life only accepts ten trainees a year. It's an incredibly prestigious offer.'
‘Father's still right,' my mother said, ‘New York is no place for a young woman without family.' ‘Eric's not family?'
‘Your brother is not the most moral of men,' my father said.
‘And what does that mean?' I said angrily.
My father was suddenly flustered, but he covered up his embarrassment by saying, ‘It doesn't matter what it means. What matters is the simple fact that I will not permit you to live in Manhattan.'
‘I am twenty-two years old, Father.'
‘That's not the issue.'
‘You have no legal right to tell me what I can or cannot do.'
‘Don't hector your father,' my mother said. ‘And I must tell you that you are making a dreadful mistake by not marrying Horace.'
‘I knew you'd say that.'
‘Horace is a splendid young man,' my father said. ‘Horace is a very nice young man with a very nice, dull future ahead of him.' ‘You are being arrogant,' he said.
‘No – just accurate. Because I will not be pushed into a life I don't want.'
‘I am not pushing you into any life…' my father said.
‘By forbidding me from going to New York, you are stopping me from taking control of my own destiny.'
‘Your destiny!' my father said, with cruel irony. ‘You actually think you have a destiny! What bad novels have you been reading at Bryn Mawr?'
I stormed out of the room. I ran upstairs and fell on the bed, sobbing. Neither of my parents came up to comfort me. Nor did I expect them to. That wasn't their style.

Quel verbe de "parole" traduit l'exaspération du père ?

Douglas Kennedy, The Pursuit of Happiness, 2002

Predictably, my parents tried to block my move there. When I announced – around three weeks before my graduation – that I had been offered a trainee job at Life, they were horrified. I was home for the weekend in Hartford (a trip I made deliberately to break the job news to them, and also to inform them that I wouldn't be accepting Horace's marriage proposal). Ten minutes into the conversation, the emotional temperature within our household quickly hit boiling point.
‘I am not having any daughter of mine living by herself in that venal, indecent city,' my father pronounced.
‘New York is hardly indecent – and Life isn't exactly Confidential,' I said, mentioning a well-known scandal sheet of the time. ‘Anyway I thought you'd be thrilled with my news. Life only accepts ten trainees a year. It's an incredibly prestigious offer.'
‘Father's still right,' my mother said, ‘New York is no place for a young woman without family.' ‘Eric's not family?'
‘Your brother is not the most moral of men,' my father said.
‘And what does that mean?' I said angrily.
My father was suddenly flustered, but he covered up his embarrassment by saying, ‘It doesn't matter what it means. What matters is the simple fact that I will not permit you to live in Manhattan.'
‘I am twenty-two years old, Father.'
‘That's not the issue.'
‘You have no legal right to tell me what I can or cannot do.'
‘Don't hector your father,' my mother said. ‘And I must tell you that you are making a dreadful mistake by not marrying Horace.'
‘I knew you'd say that.'
‘Horace is a splendid young man,' my father said. ‘Horace is a very nice young man with a very nice, dull future ahead of him.' ‘You are being arrogant,' he said.
‘No – just accurate. Because I will not be pushed into a life I don't want.'
‘I am not pushing you into any life…' my father said.
‘By forbidding me from going to New York, you are stopping me from taking control of my own destiny.'
‘Your destiny!' my father said, with cruel irony. ‘You actually think you have a destiny! What bad novels have you been reading at Bryn Mawr?'
I stormed out of the room. I ran upstairs and fell on the bed, sobbing. Neither of my parents came up to comfort me. Nor did I expect them to. That wasn't their style.

Quelle expression traduit l'idée selon laquelle tout avait été planifié ?

Douglas Kennedy, The Pursuit of Happiness, 2002

Predictably, my parents tried to block my move there. When I announced – around three weeks before my graduation – that I had been offered a trainee job at Life, they were horrified. I was home for the weekend in Hartford (a trip I made deliberately to break the job news to them, and also to inform them that I wouldn't be accepting Horace's marriage proposal). Ten minutes into the conversation, the emotional temperature within our household quickly hit boiling point.
‘I am not having any daughter of mine living by herself in that venal, indecent city,' my father pronounced.
‘New York is hardly indecent – and Life isn't exactly Confidential,' I said, mentioning a well-known scandal sheet of the time. ‘Anyway I thought you'd be thrilled with my news. Life only accepts ten trainees a year. It's an incredibly prestigious offer.'
‘Father's still right,' my mother said, ‘New York is no place for a young woman without family.' ‘Eric's not family?'
‘Your brother is not the most moral of men,' my father said.
‘And what does that mean?' I said angrily.
My father was suddenly flustered, but he covered up his embarrassment by saying, ‘It doesn't matter what it means. What matters is the simple fact that I will not permit you to live in Manhattan.'
‘I am twenty-two years old, Father.'
‘That's not the issue.'
‘You have no legal right to tell me what I can or cannot do.'
‘Don't hector your father,' my mother said. ‘And I must tell you that you are making a dreadful mistake by not marrying Horace.'
‘I knew you'd say that.'
‘Horace is a splendid young man,' my father said. ‘Horace is a very nice young man with a very nice, dull future ahead of him.' ‘You are being arrogant,' he said.
‘No – just accurate. Because I will not be pushed into a life I don't want.'
‘I am not pushing you into any life…' my father said.
‘By forbidding me from going to New York, you are stopping me from taking control of my own destiny.'
‘Your destiny!' my father said, with cruel irony. ‘You actually think you have a destiny! What bad novels have you been reading at Bryn Mawr?'
I stormed out of the room. I ran upstairs and fell on the bed, sobbing. Neither of my parents came up to comfort me. Nor did I expect them to. That wasn't their style.

Quelle expression traduit le fait de "reprendre ses esprits" ?

Douglas Kennedy, The Pursuit of Happiness, 2002

Predictably, my parents tried to block my move there. When I announced – around three weeks before my graduation – that I had been offered a trainee job at Life, they were horrified. I was home for the weekend in Hartford (a trip I made deliberately to break the job news to them, and also to inform them that I wouldn't be accepting Horace's marriage proposal). Ten minutes into the conversation, the emotional temperature within our household quickly hit boiling point.
‘I am not having any daughter of mine living by herself in that venal, indecent city,' my father pronounced.
‘New York is hardly indecent – and Life isn't exactly Confidential,' I said, mentioning a well-known scandal sheet of the time. ‘Anyway I thought you'd be thrilled with my news. Life only accepts ten trainees a year. It's an incredibly prestigious offer.'
‘Father's still right,' my mother said, ‘New York is no place for a young woman without family.' ‘Eric's not family?'
‘Your brother is not the most moral of men,' my father said.
‘And what does that mean?' I said angrily.
My father was suddenly flustered, but he covered up his embarrassment by saying, ‘It doesn't matter what it means. What matters is the simple fact that I will not permit you to live in Manhattan.'
‘I am twenty-two years old, Father.'
‘That's not the issue.'
‘You have no legal right to tell me what I can or cannot do.'
‘Don't hector your father,' my mother said. ‘And I must tell you that you are making a dreadful mistake by not marrying Horace.'
‘I knew you'd say that.'
‘Horace is a splendid young man,' my father said. ‘Horace is a very nice young man with a very nice, dull future ahead of him.' ‘You are being arrogant,' he said.
‘No – just accurate. Because I will not be pushed into a life I don't want.'
‘I am not pushing you into any life…' my father said.
‘By forbidding me from going to New York, you are stopping me from taking control of my own destiny.'
‘Your destiny!' my father said, with cruel irony. ‘You actually think you have a destiny! What bad novels have you been reading at Bryn Mawr?'
I stormed out of the room. I ran upstairs and fell on the bed, sobbing. Neither of my parents came up to comfort me. Nor did I expect them to. That wasn't their style.

Quel verbe de parole traduit une voix agressive ?

Douglas Kennedy, The Pursuit of Happiness, 2002

Predictably, my parents tried to block my move there. When I announced – around three weeks before my graduation – that I had been offered a trainee job at Life, they were horrified. I was home for the weekend in Hartford (a trip I made deliberately to break the job news to them, and also to inform them that I wouldn't be accepting Horace's marriage proposal). Ten minutes into the conversation, the emotional temperature within our household quickly hit boiling point.
‘I am not having any daughter of mine living by herself in that venal, indecent city,' my father pronounced.
‘New York is hardly indecent – and Life isn't exactly Confidential,' I said, mentioning a well-known scandal sheet of the time. ‘Anyway I thought you'd be thrilled with my news. Life only accepts ten trainees a year. It's an incredibly prestigious offer.'
‘Father's still right,' my mother said, ‘New York is no place for a young woman without family.' ‘Eric's not family?'
‘Your brother is not the most moral of men,' my father said.
‘And what does that mean?' I said angrily.
My father was suddenly flustered, but he covered up his embarrassment by saying, ‘It doesn't matter what it means. What matters is the simple fact that I will not permit you to live in Manhattan.'
‘I am twenty-two years old, Father.'
‘That's not the issue.'
‘You have no legal right to tell me what I can or cannot do.'
‘Don't hector your father,' my mother said. ‘And I must tell you that you are making a dreadful mistake by not marrying Horace.'
‘I knew you'd say that.'
‘Horace is a splendid young man,' my father said. ‘Horace is a very nice young man with a very nice, dull future ahead of him.' ‘You are being arrogant,' he said.
‘No – just accurate. Because I will not be pushed into a life I don't want.'
‘I am not pushing you into any life…' my father said.
‘By forbidding me from going to New York, you are stopping me from taking control of my own destiny.'
‘Your destiny!' my father said, with cruel irony. ‘You actually think you have a destiny! What bad novels have you been reading at Bryn Mawr?'
I stormed out of the room. I ran upstairs and fell on the bed, sobbing. Neither of my parents came up to comfort me. Nor did I expect them to. That wasn't their style.