Eddie's returnInvention type bac

Polynésie, 2015, LV1

After the war, Eddie suddenly reappears at Betty's door. Write the conversation.

The Hotel de la Plage

Ben Macintyre, Agent Zigzag, 2007

Spring came early to the island of Jersey in 1939, and the sun that poured through the dining-room window of the Hotel de la Plage formed a dazzling halo around the man sitting opposite Betty Farmer with his back to the sea, laughing as he tucked into the six-shilling Sunday Roast Special ‘with all the trimmings'. Betty, eighteen, a farm girl newly escaped from the Shropshire countryside, knew this man was quite unlike any she had met before.
Beyond that, her knowledge of Eddie Chapman was somewhat limited. She knew that he was twenty-four years old, tall and handsome, with a thin moustache – just like Errol Flynn in The Charge of the Light Brigade – and deep hazel eyes. His voice was strong but high-pitched with a hint of a north-eastern accent. He was "bubbly", full of laughter and mischief. She knew he must be rich because he was "in the film business" and drove a Bentley. He wore expensive suits, a gold ring and a cashmere overcoat with mink1 collar. Today he wore a natty yellow spotted tie and a sleeveless pullover. They had met at a club in Kensington Church Street, and although at first she had declined his invitation to dance, she soon relented. Eddie had become her first lover, but then he vanished, saying he had urgent business in Scotland. "I shall go," he told her. "But I shall always come back."
Good as his word, Eddie had suddenly reappeared at the door of her lodgings, grinning and breathless. "How would you like to go to Jersey, then possibly to the south of France?" he asked. Betty had rushed off to pack.
It was a surprise to discover they would be travelling with company. In the front seat of the waiting Bentley sat two men: the driver a huge, ugly brute with a crumpled face; the other small, thin and dark. The pair did not seem ideal companions for a romantic holiday. The driver gunned the engine and they set off at thrilling speed through the London streets, screeching into Croydon airport, parking behind the hangar, just in time to catch the Jersey Airways plane.
That evening they had checked into the seafront hotel. Eddie told the receptionist they were in Jersey to make a film. They had signed the register as Mr and Mrs Farmer of Torquay. After dinner they moved on to West Park Pavilion, a nightclub on the pier, where they danced, played roulette, and drank some more. For Betty, it had been a day of unprecedented glamour and decadence.
War was coming, everyone said so, but the dining room of the Hotel de la Plage was a place of pure peace that sunny Sunday. Beyond the golden beach, the waves flickered among a scatter of tiny islands, as Eddie and Betty ate trifle2 off plates with smart blue crests. Eddie was half way through telling another funny story, when he froze. A group of men in overcoats and brown hats had entered the restaurant and one was now in urgent conversation with the head waiter. Before Betty could speak, Eddie stood up, bent down to kiss her once, and then jumped through the window, which was closed. There was a storm of broken glass, tumbling crockery, screaming women and shouting waiters: Betty Farmer caught a last glimpse of Eddie Chapman sprinting off down the beach with two overcoated men in pursuit.

1 Mink : expensive fur made from a small animal.
2 Trifle : a type of dessert.

Quel texte faut-il rédiger ?

The Hotel de la Plage

Ben Macintyre, Agent Zigzag, 2007

Spring came early to the island of Jersey in 1939, and the sun that poured through the dining-room window of the Hotel de la Plage formed a dazzling halo around the man sitting opposite Betty Farmer with his back to the sea, laughing as he tucked into the six-shilling Sunday Roast Special ‘with all the trimmings'. Betty, eighteen, a farm girl newly escaped from the Shropshire countryside, knew this man was quite unlike any she had met before.
Beyond that, her knowledge of Eddie Chapman was somewhat limited. She knew that he was twenty-four years old, tall and handsome, with a thin moustache – just like Errol Flynn in The Charge of the Light Brigade – and deep hazel eyes. His voice was strong but high-pitched with a hint of a north-eastern accent. He was "bubbly", full of laughter and mischief. She knew he must be rich because he was "in the film business" and drove a Bentley. He wore expensive suits, a gold ring and a cashmere overcoat with mink1 collar. Today he wore a natty yellow spotted tie and a sleeveless pullover. They had met at a club in Kensington Church Street, and although at first she had declined his invitation to dance, she soon relented. Eddie had become her first lover, but then he vanished, saying he had urgent business in Scotland. "I shall go," he told her. "But I shall always come back."
Good as his word, Eddie had suddenly reappeared at the door of her lodgings, grinning and breathless. "How would you like to go to Jersey, then possibly to the south of France?" he asked. Betty had rushed off to pack.
It was a surprise to discover they would be travelling with company. In the front seat of the waiting Bentley sat two men: the driver a huge, ugly brute with a crumpled face; the other small, thin and dark. The pair did not seem ideal companions for a romantic holiday. The driver gunned the engine and they set off at thrilling speed through the London streets, screeching into Croydon airport, parking behind the hangar, just in time to catch the Jersey Airways plane.
That evening they had checked into the seafront hotel. Eddie told the receptionist they were in Jersey to make a film. They had signed the register as Mr and Mrs Farmer of Torquay. After dinner they moved on to West Park Pavilion, a nightclub on the pier, where they danced, played roulette, and drank some more. For Betty, it had been a day of unprecedented glamour and decadence.
War was coming, everyone said so, but the dining room of the Hotel de la Plage was a place of pure peace that sunny Sunday. Beyond the golden beach, the waves flickered among a scatter of tiny islands, as Eddie and Betty ate trifle2 off plates with smart blue crests. Eddie was half way through telling another funny story, when he froze. A group of men in overcoats and brown hats had entered the restaurant and one was now in urgent conversation with the head waiter. Before Betty could speak, Eddie stood up, bent down to kiss her once, and then jumped through the window, which was closed. There was a storm of broken glass, tumbling crockery, screaming women and shouting waiters: Betty Farmer caught a last glimpse of Eddie Chapman sprinting off down the beach with two overcoated men in pursuit.

1 Mink : expensive fur made from a small animal.
2 Trifle : a type of dessert.

Quels champs lexicaux faut-il mettre en avant ?

The Hotel de la Plage

Ben Macintyre, Agent Zigzag, 2007

Spring came early to the island of Jersey in 1939, and the sun that poured through the dining-room window of the Hotel de la Plage formed a dazzling halo around the man sitting opposite Betty Farmer with his back to the sea, laughing as he tucked into the six-shilling Sunday Roast Special ‘with all the trimmings'. Betty, eighteen, a farm girl newly escaped from the Shropshire countryside, knew this man was quite unlike any she had met before.
Beyond that, her knowledge of Eddie Chapman was somewhat limited. She knew that he was twenty-four years old, tall and handsome, with a thin moustache – just like Errol Flynn in The Charge of the Light Brigade – and deep hazel eyes. His voice was strong but high-pitched with a hint of a north-eastern accent. He was "bubbly", full of laughter and mischief. She knew he must be rich because he was "in the film business" and drove a Bentley. He wore expensive suits, a gold ring and a cashmere overcoat with mink1 collar. Today he wore a natty yellow spotted tie and a sleeveless pullover. They had met at a club in Kensington Church Street, and although at first she had declined his invitation to dance, she soon relented. Eddie had become her first lover, but then he vanished, saying he had urgent business in Scotland. "I shall go," he told her. "But I shall always come back."
Good as his word, Eddie had suddenly reappeared at the door of her lodgings, grinning and breathless. "How would you like to go to Jersey, then possibly to the south of France?" he asked. Betty had rushed off to pack.
It was a surprise to discover they would be travelling with company. In the front seat of the waiting Bentley sat two men: the driver a huge, ugly brute with a crumpled face; the other small, thin and dark. The pair did not seem ideal companions for a romantic holiday. The driver gunned the engine and they set off at thrilling speed through the London streets, screeching into Croydon airport, parking behind the hangar, just in time to catch the Jersey Airways plane.
That evening they had checked into the seafront hotel. Eddie told the receptionist they were in Jersey to make a film. They had signed the register as Mr and Mrs Farmer of Torquay. After dinner they moved on to West Park Pavilion, a nightclub on the pier, where they danced, played roulette, and drank some more. For Betty, it had been a day of unprecedented glamour and decadence.
War was coming, everyone said so, but the dining room of the Hotel de la Plage was a place of pure peace that sunny Sunday. Beyond the golden beach, the waves flickered among a scatter of tiny islands, as Eddie and Betty ate trifle2 off plates with smart blue crests. Eddie was half way through telling another funny story, when he froze. A group of men in overcoats and brown hats had entered the restaurant and one was now in urgent conversation with the head waiter. Before Betty could speak, Eddie stood up, bent down to kiss her once, and then jumped through the window, which was closed. There was a storm of broken glass, tumbling crockery, screaming women and shouting waiters: Betty Farmer caught a last glimpse of Eddie Chapman sprinting off down the beach with two overcoated men in pursuit.

1 Mink : expensive fur made from a small animal.
2 Trifle : a type of dessert.

Quelle expression anglaise traduit l'incrédulité ?

The Hotel de la Plage

Ben Macintyre, Agent Zigzag, 2007

Spring came early to the island of Jersey in 1939, and the sun that poured through the dining-room window of the Hotel de la Plage formed a dazzling halo around the man sitting opposite Betty Farmer with his back to the sea, laughing as he tucked into the six-shilling Sunday Roast Special ‘with all the trimmings'. Betty, eighteen, a farm girl newly escaped from the Shropshire countryside, knew this man was quite unlike any she had met before.
Beyond that, her knowledge of Eddie Chapman was somewhat limited. She knew that he was twenty-four years old, tall and handsome, with a thin moustache – just like Errol Flynn in The Charge of the Light Brigade – and deep hazel eyes. His voice was strong but high-pitched with a hint of a north-eastern accent. He was "bubbly", full of laughter and mischief. She knew he must be rich because he was "in the film business" and drove a Bentley. He wore expensive suits, a gold ring and a cashmere overcoat with mink1 collar. Today he wore a natty yellow spotted tie and a sleeveless pullover. They had met at a club in Kensington Church Street, and although at first she had declined his invitation to dance, she soon relented. Eddie had become her first lover, but then he vanished, saying he had urgent business in Scotland. "I shall go," he told her. "But I shall always come back."
Good as his word, Eddie had suddenly reappeared at the door of her lodgings, grinning and breathless. "How would you like to go to Jersey, then possibly to the south of France?" he asked. Betty had rushed off to pack.
It was a surprise to discover they would be travelling with company. In the front seat of the waiting Bentley sat two men: the driver a huge, ugly brute with a crumpled face; the other small, thin and dark. The pair did not seem ideal companions for a romantic holiday. The driver gunned the engine and they set off at thrilling speed through the London streets, screeching into Croydon airport, parking behind the hangar, just in time to catch the Jersey Airways plane.
That evening they had checked into the seafront hotel. Eddie told the receptionist they were in Jersey to make a film. They had signed the register as Mr and Mrs Farmer of Torquay. After dinner they moved on to West Park Pavilion, a nightclub on the pier, where they danced, played roulette, and drank some more. For Betty, it had been a day of unprecedented glamour and decadence.
War was coming, everyone said so, but the dining room of the Hotel de la Plage was a place of pure peace that sunny Sunday. Beyond the golden beach, the waves flickered among a scatter of tiny islands, as Eddie and Betty ate trifle2 off plates with smart blue crests. Eddie was half way through telling another funny story, when he froze. A group of men in overcoats and brown hats had entered the restaurant and one was now in urgent conversation with the head waiter. Before Betty could speak, Eddie stood up, bent down to kiss her once, and then jumped through the window, which was closed. There was a storm of broken glass, tumbling crockery, screaming women and shouting waiters: Betty Farmer caught a last glimpse of Eddie Chapman sprinting off down the beach with two overcoated men in pursuit.

1 Mink : expensive fur made from a small animal.
2 Trifle : a type of dessert.

Quel terme fait référence à une situation d'une extrême difficulté ?

The Hotel de la Plage

Ben Macintyre, Agent Zigzag, 2007

Spring came early to the island of Jersey in 1939, and the sun that poured through the dining-room window of the Hotel de la Plage formed a dazzling halo around the man sitting opposite Betty Farmer with his back to the sea, laughing as he tucked into the six-shilling Sunday Roast Special ‘with all the trimmings'. Betty, eighteen, a farm girl newly escaped from the Shropshire countryside, knew this man was quite unlike any she had met before.
Beyond that, her knowledge of Eddie Chapman was somewhat limited. She knew that he was twenty-four years old, tall and handsome, with a thin moustache – just like Errol Flynn in The Charge of the Light Brigade – and deep hazel eyes. His voice was strong but high-pitched with a hint of a north-eastern accent. He was "bubbly", full of laughter and mischief. She knew he must be rich because he was "in the film business" and drove a Bentley. He wore expensive suits, a gold ring and a cashmere overcoat with mink1 collar. Today he wore a natty yellow spotted tie and a sleeveless pullover. They had met at a club in Kensington Church Street, and although at first she had declined his invitation to dance, she soon relented. Eddie had become her first lover, but then he vanished, saying he had urgent business in Scotland. "I shall go," he told her. "But I shall always come back."
Good as his word, Eddie had suddenly reappeared at the door of her lodgings, grinning and breathless. "How would you like to go to Jersey, then possibly to the south of France?" he asked. Betty had rushed off to pack.
It was a surprise to discover they would be travelling with company. In the front seat of the waiting Bentley sat two men: the driver a huge, ugly brute with a crumpled face; the other small, thin and dark. The pair did not seem ideal companions for a romantic holiday. The driver gunned the engine and they set off at thrilling speed through the London streets, screeching into Croydon airport, parking behind the hangar, just in time to catch the Jersey Airways plane.
That evening they had checked into the seafront hotel. Eddie told the receptionist they were in Jersey to make a film. They had signed the register as Mr and Mrs Farmer of Torquay. After dinner they moved on to West Park Pavilion, a nightclub on the pier, where they danced, played roulette, and drank some more. For Betty, it had been a day of unprecedented glamour and decadence.
War was coming, everyone said so, but the dining room of the Hotel de la Plage was a place of pure peace that sunny Sunday. Beyond the golden beach, the waves flickered among a scatter of tiny islands, as Eddie and Betty ate trifle2 off plates with smart blue crests. Eddie was half way through telling another funny story, when he froze. A group of men in overcoats and brown hats had entered the restaurant and one was now in urgent conversation with the head waiter. Before Betty could speak, Eddie stood up, bent down to kiss her once, and then jumped through the window, which was closed. There was a storm of broken glass, tumbling crockery, screaming women and shouting waiters: Betty Farmer caught a last glimpse of Eddie Chapman sprinting off down the beach with two overcoated men in pursuit.

1 Mink : expensive fur made from a small animal.
2 Trifle : a type of dessert.

Quel terme fait référence aux blessures physiques et psychologiques ?

The Hotel de la Plage

Ben Macintyre, Agent Zigzag, 2007

Spring came early to the island of Jersey in 1939, and the sun that poured through the dining-room window of the Hotel de la Plage formed a dazzling halo around the man sitting opposite Betty Farmer with his back to the sea, laughing as he tucked into the six-shilling Sunday Roast Special ‘with all the trimmings'. Betty, eighteen, a farm girl newly escaped from the Shropshire countryside, knew this man was quite unlike any she had met before.
Beyond that, her knowledge of Eddie Chapman was somewhat limited. She knew that he was twenty-four years old, tall and handsome, with a thin moustache – just like Errol Flynn in The Charge of the Light Brigade – and deep hazel eyes. His voice was strong but high-pitched with a hint of a north-eastern accent. He was "bubbly", full of laughter and mischief. She knew he must be rich because he was "in the film business" and drove a Bentley. He wore expensive suits, a gold ring and a cashmere overcoat with mink1 collar. Today he wore a natty yellow spotted tie and a sleeveless pullover. They had met at a club in Kensington Church Street, and although at first she had declined his invitation to dance, she soon relented. Eddie had become her first lover, but then he vanished, saying he had urgent business in Scotland. "I shall go," he told her. "But I shall always come back."
Good as his word, Eddie had suddenly reappeared at the door of her lodgings, grinning and breathless. "How would you like to go to Jersey, then possibly to the south of France?" he asked. Betty had rushed off to pack.
It was a surprise to discover they would be travelling with company. In the front seat of the waiting Bentley sat two men: the driver a huge, ugly brute with a crumpled face; the other small, thin and dark. The pair did not seem ideal companions for a romantic holiday. The driver gunned the engine and they set off at thrilling speed through the London streets, screeching into Croydon airport, parking behind the hangar, just in time to catch the Jersey Airways plane.
That evening they had checked into the seafront hotel. Eddie told the receptionist they were in Jersey to make a film. They had signed the register as Mr and Mrs Farmer of Torquay. After dinner they moved on to West Park Pavilion, a nightclub on the pier, where they danced, played roulette, and drank some more. For Betty, it had been a day of unprecedented glamour and decadence.
War was coming, everyone said so, but the dining room of the Hotel de la Plage was a place of pure peace that sunny Sunday. Beyond the golden beach, the waves flickered among a scatter of tiny islands, as Eddie and Betty ate trifle2 off plates with smart blue crests. Eddie was half way through telling another funny story, when he froze. A group of men in overcoats and brown hats had entered the restaurant and one was now in urgent conversation with the head waiter. Before Betty could speak, Eddie stood up, bent down to kiss her once, and then jumped through the window, which was closed. There was a storm of broken glass, tumbling crockery, screaming women and shouting waiters: Betty Farmer caught a last glimpse of Eddie Chapman sprinting off down the beach with two overcoated men in pursuit.

1 Mink : expensive fur made from a small animal.
2 Trifle : a type of dessert.