A reader's reaction Invention type bac

Amérique du Sud, 2016, LV1

The New York Times readers react to Susan Greenberg's article (document A). Write two comments expressing different opinions that will be posted under her article on The New York Times website.

In Fervent Support of the ‘Gap Year' by Susan H. Greenberg

The New York Times, January 4, 2015

I wasn't enthusiastic when my daughter first floated her plan to take a “gap year” before college. I didn't see the point of delaying that great intellectual awakening. And what if her gap year turned into a permanent crevasse and she never earned a degree? […] But she needed a break. Besides, my husband and I weren't eager to pay for a college education she wasn't ready for. […]
She remained preternaturally calm about the prospect of moving overseas until about a month before her departure. “I hope I don't freak out when I get there,” she remarked one day. “You know, being in a foreign country where I don't know anyone, not speaking the language, living by myself…” I, of course, had been silently considering that possibility for months. But rather than scream, “Well, DUH! Shouldn't you have thought about that before?” I simply said, “What's the worst that can happen? If you hate it, you'll do something else.”

I needn't have worried. Taking a gap year turned out to be one of the smartest decisions my daughter has ever made. She had a spectacular experience in Salzburg, bonding with her lost family, perfecting her German, traveling through Europe with assorted new friends, and otherwise developing the confidence and skills necessary to navigate unfamiliar terrain.
By the time she started college this fall, she couldn't have been better prepared – or more excited. She approached the whole experience of picking classes, making friends and trying new activities with a newfound sense of purpose and perspective. The gap year broadened her academic interests […] as well as deepened her extracurricular ones.

Quel type de texte faut-il rédiger ?

In Fervent Support of the ‘Gap Year' by Susan H. Greenberg

The New York Times, January 4, 2015

I wasn't enthusiastic when my daughter first floated her plan to take a “gap year” before college. I didn't see the point of delaying that great intellectual awakening. And what if her gap year turned into a permanent crevasse and she never earned a degree? […] But she needed a break. Besides, my husband and I weren't eager to pay for a college education she wasn't ready for. […]
She remained preternaturally calm about the prospect of moving overseas until about a month before her departure. “I hope I don't freak out when I get there,” she remarked one day. “You know, being in a foreign country where I don't know anyone, not speaking the language, living by myself…” I, of course, had been silently considering that possibility for months. But rather than scream, “Well, DUH! Shouldn't you have thought about that before?” I simply said, “What's the worst that can happen? If you hate it, you'll do something else.”

I needn't have worried. Taking a gap year turned out to be one of the smartest decisions my daughter has ever made. She had a spectacular experience in Salzburg, bonding with her lost family, perfecting her German, traveling through Europe with assorted new friends, and otherwise developing the confidence and skills necessary to navigate unfamiliar terrain.
By the time she started college this fall, she couldn't have been better prepared – or more excited. She approached the whole experience of picking classes, making friends and trying new activities with a newfound sense of purpose and perspective. The gap year broadened her academic interests […] as well as deepened her extracurricular ones.

Quelles conventions faut-il respecter ?

In Fervent Support of the ‘Gap Year' by Susan H. Greenberg

The New York Times, January 4, 2015

I wasn't enthusiastic when my daughter first floated her plan to take a “gap year” before college. I didn't see the point of delaying that great intellectual awakening. And what if her gap year turned into a permanent crevasse and she never earned a degree? […] But she needed a break. Besides, my husband and I weren't eager to pay for a college education she wasn't ready for. […]
She remained preternaturally calm about the prospect of moving overseas until about a month before her departure. “I hope I don't freak out when I get there,” she remarked one day. “You know, being in a foreign country where I don't know anyone, not speaking the language, living by myself…” I, of course, had been silently considering that possibility for months. But rather than scream, “Well, DUH! Shouldn't you have thought about that before?” I simply said, “What's the worst that can happen? If you hate it, you'll do something else.”

I needn't have worried. Taking a gap year turned out to be one of the smartest decisions my daughter has ever made. She had a spectacular experience in Salzburg, bonding with her lost family, perfecting her German, traveling through Europe with assorted new friends, and otherwise developing the confidence and skills necessary to navigate unfamiliar terrain.
By the time she started college this fall, she couldn't have been better prepared – or more excited. She approached the whole experience of picking classes, making friends and trying new activities with a newfound sense of purpose and perspective. The gap year broadened her academic interests […] as well as deepened her extracurricular ones.

Quelle expression permet de nuancer un propos ?

In Fervent Support of the ‘Gap Year' by Susan H. Greenberg

The New York Times, January 4, 2015

I wasn't enthusiastic when my daughter first floated her plan to take a “gap year” before college. I didn't see the point of delaying that great intellectual awakening. And what if her gap year turned into a permanent crevasse and she never earned a degree? […] But she needed a break. Besides, my husband and I weren't eager to pay for a college education she wasn't ready for. […]
She remained preternaturally calm about the prospect of moving overseas until about a month before her departure. “I hope I don't freak out when I get there,” she remarked one day. “You know, being in a foreign country where I don't know anyone, not speaking the language, living by myself…” I, of course, had been silently considering that possibility for months. But rather than scream, “Well, DUH! Shouldn't you have thought about that before?” I simply said, “What's the worst that can happen? If you hate it, you'll do something else.”

I needn't have worried. Taking a gap year turned out to be one of the smartest decisions my daughter has ever made. She had a spectacular experience in Salzburg, bonding with her lost family, perfecting her German, traveling through Europe with assorted new friends, and otherwise developing the confidence and skills necessary to navigate unfamiliar terrain.
By the time she started college this fall, she couldn't have been better prepared – or more excited. She approached the whole experience of picking classes, making friends and trying new activities with a newfound sense of purpose and perspective. The gap year broadened her academic interests […] as well as deepened her extracurricular ones.

Quel terme, synonyme de "children" permet de se référer aux enfants ?

In Fervent Support of the ‘Gap Year' by Susan H. Greenberg

The New York Times, January 4, 2015

I wasn't enthusiastic when my daughter first floated her plan to take a “gap year” before college. I didn't see the point of delaying that great intellectual awakening. And what if her gap year turned into a permanent crevasse and she never earned a degree? […] But she needed a break. Besides, my husband and I weren't eager to pay for a college education she wasn't ready for. […]
She remained preternaturally calm about the prospect of moving overseas until about a month before her departure. “I hope I don't freak out when I get there,” she remarked one day. “You know, being in a foreign country where I don't know anyone, not speaking the language, living by myself…” I, of course, had been silently considering that possibility for months. But rather than scream, “Well, DUH! Shouldn't you have thought about that before?” I simply said, “What's the worst that can happen? If you hate it, you'll do something else.”

I needn't have worried. Taking a gap year turned out to be one of the smartest decisions my daughter has ever made. She had a spectacular experience in Salzburg, bonding with her lost family, perfecting her German, traveling through Europe with assorted new friends, and otherwise developing the confidence and skills necessary to navigate unfamiliar terrain.
By the time she started college this fall, she couldn't have been better prepared – or more excited. She approached the whole experience of picking classes, making friends and trying new activities with a newfound sense of purpose and perspective. The gap year broadened her academic interests […] as well as deepened her extracurricular ones.

Quel verbe prépositionnel traduit le fait de "tomber par hasard sur quelque chose" ?

In Fervent Support of the ‘Gap Year' by Susan H. Greenberg

The New York Times, January 4, 2015

I wasn't enthusiastic when my daughter first floated her plan to take a “gap year” before college. I didn't see the point of delaying that great intellectual awakening. And what if her gap year turned into a permanent crevasse and she never earned a degree? […] But she needed a break. Besides, my husband and I weren't eager to pay for a college education she wasn't ready for. […]
She remained preternaturally calm about the prospect of moving overseas until about a month before her departure. “I hope I don't freak out when I get there,” she remarked one day. “You know, being in a foreign country where I don't know anyone, not speaking the language, living by myself…” I, of course, had been silently considering that possibility for months. But rather than scream, “Well, DUH! Shouldn't you have thought about that before?” I simply said, “What's the worst that can happen? If you hate it, you'll do something else.”

I needn't have worried. Taking a gap year turned out to be one of the smartest decisions my daughter has ever made. She had a spectacular experience in Salzburg, bonding with her lost family, perfecting her German, traveling through Europe with assorted new friends, and otherwise developing the confidence and skills necessary to navigate unfamiliar terrain.
By the time she started college this fall, she couldn't have been better prepared – or more excited. She approached the whole experience of picking classes, making friends and trying new activities with a newfound sense of purpose and perspective. The gap year broadened her academic interests […] as well as deepened her extracurricular ones.